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What Is Relative Humidity?

  • Air Quality Facts
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The humidity outside or in your home can have an effect on your health and well-being. If it's too humid, it could make your body work harder to cool itself down, and if it's too dry, it can pose problems in the form of sore throats, stuffy noses and other types of physical discomfort. However, the concept of humidity is quite complex and goes far beyond just "humid" or "dry." To truly understand how it works, it's important to be familiar with the term "relative humidity."

"Relative humidity is the measurement of how humid it is in regard to the moisture threshold."

Relative humidity can be defined as the amount of water vapor in the air compared to the maximum amount that the air could contain at the same temperature. If that's a difficult concept to grasp, it's basically just the measurement of how humid it is in regard to the moisture threshold. For example, when the humidity level outside is at 100 percent, it results in rain (though that's not the only level at which it can rain). When the relative humidity is at zero percent, it can make the temperature feel colder than it actually is. On the other hand, when the percentage is at 100, it can feel much hotter, since your perspiration can't easily evaporate in excessively humid conditions.

Generally speaking, people feel most comfortable at relative humidity levels of 45 percent. For optimal indoor air quality, keep a humidifier running - especially during the winter, when the air is extremely dry and harsh. The Holmes® Smart Humidifier with WeMo® allows you to easily check humidity levels and program the device to maintain the perfect amount of moisture for your room. You're also able to control it from your smartphone, so no matter where you are, you can ensure that you'll be walking into a comfortable home when you get back.

 
 

 

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